Home Page - Gulf in the Media
HomePoliticsEconomy                               Set Gulfinthemedia.com as home page
Opinions
"Postings of opinions published in the Gulf and international newspapers
 Print  Send This Page
Save Listen to this Article
The Middle East: 5 'US' years later!   

Saudi Gazette - 01 May, 2012
Author: Khaled M. Batarfi

It is sometimes necessary for writers to take a break every now and then, and return with a fresher outlook and perspective. Back in 2007, my sojourn from writing was not voluntary, as wiser heads advised me to keep a low profile. Now the new Editor-in-Chief of Saudi Gazette Khaled Almaeena is telling me: "Open up... Your opinion is called for."
It’s amazing how much, or how little, things have changed in the past five years. Take Iraq, for example. Five years ago, it was still debatable whether the US meant what it said, and said what it meant regarding the future of Iraq.
Today, it is obvious that the US has failed in all the arenas of sincerity and competence. Iraq has been delivered on a silver plate to Iran and its Iraqi stooges. It’s no longer united, stable or safe. The promise of freedom, prosperity and democracy is but a forgotten dream. The immediate and foremost concern now is security.
My Iraqi friend Ibtehal, was chatting with me about her trip to the Kurdish north, and how different it was from the rest of the country: secure, stable, prosperous, and well governed. She is looking for investment opportunities among the waves of multinational investors seeking potential business ventures. “Good, I said, but what about the rest of the country?” Her answer was prompt and heartbreaking: “What country? I don’t have one!”
America’s foot soldiers are finally leaving Iraqi soil, but their footprints are not. For obscure political and economic reasons, their decision makers brought Nouri Al-Maliki back from Iran, together with his exiled Al-Da’wa party comrades. In spite of Al-Maliki’s known attachment to Iran’s clerics, and ideological differences with the Sunnis, the US promoted their government, supporting them economically, politically and militarily. He was supposed to be their stooge. Today, with diminishing power and influence in Iraq, America cannot even persuade the Al-Maliki government to adopt the US position on Syria.
Prophet Mohammad (pbuh) said: “Those who support the aggressor will be hunted by him.” The US may feel safe for now, but once the last soldier leaves, and more Hezbollah soldiers (and commanders) take over, the game will begin. America cannot change its fundamental blind support for Israel, the arch-enemy of Iran, and the latter cannot suppress its appetite for more gains and influence in the Middle East.
Therefore a final face-off is assured. With the military and nuclear capabilities and aspirations of both countries, and the vulnerabilities of the oil rich region, the result will be a global economic tsunami. America’s interests and friends will be the first to feel the punch.
For the residents of the Arabian Gulf, the stakes are much higher. The battleground for any future conflict may include neighbors like Turkey and Pakistan, but it would primarily be fought in our backyard. Our oil fields and ports are all concentrated on the coasts of Iran and Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and UAE. The oil tankers that supply much of the world all go through the Strait of Hormuz. It’s frightening to imagine an inferno, let alone a war among nuclear powers on such volatile grounds!
Let us hope that cool heads prevail, especially in the US. I pray that new policies will reposition and reengineer current US stands toward the regional players and conflicts. Till then, I hope that my return to active commenting will be a happier and safer one!

— Dr. Khaled Batarfi is a Saudi writer based in Jeddah. He can be reached at: Kbatarfi@gmail.com
 
Total 200 Results in 14 Pages
  3 
For more news, views and reports about this topic, please subscribe
to GRC website: www.grc.net
Sun Dec 4, 2016| 04-ربيع أول-1438هـ
Kuwait's opposition 'needs unity' after poll comeback
Mohammed bin Zayed, Sisi discuss ways of deepening ties
Oil price gains from Opec production cut deal seen supporting Gulf markets
Syria operation against terror groups only: Erdogan
Presidential aide hails Iran-Russia agreement on oil market
UN envoy meets Yemen President Hadi in new move to end conflict
Saudi stock market hits highest close for 2016
Iranians face terror charges for filming Israeli Embassy
Trip down prosperity lane: A look back at the UAE's road to success
Austria to bolster ties with Qatar
Joint efforts by Saudi Arabia and UAE helped stabilize region
Zangeneh hails OPEC's crucial decision
Arab League chief urges end to Israeli occupation
Kingdom, OIC express support for Palestinians
  Op-Ed
Collaboration is key to Paris climate deal
Oil producing countries will fare better with a deal
At 45, the UAE deserves a global round of applause
A day for celebration, appreciation and reflection
More>>  
    Reports
NBK Report on oil markets
GCC Banking Sector Quarterly - 2Q16
More>>  
    GCC Press Agencies
Day's main stories from the GCC Press Agencies
    GRC Analysis
The Benefits of NATO-GCC Strategic Ties
The GCC and the EU's New Global Strategy
For the GCC States, a different Europe to deal with
    GRC Commentary
Climate COP 22 in Marrakech Important for the Region
Earth Day 2016: The Promised Day
An Evolving Saudi-US Relationship
    GRC Press Release
Gulf Research Center press releases to the media
    GRC Publications
Sustainable Development Goals: Challenges and Opportunities for the GCC Countries
Salalah: The Economic Development and Spatial Fragmentation of a Globalized Port City in Southern Oman
Domestic Ramifications of the JCPOA for Iran
    GRC Newsletters/Bulletins

Enter your email to get the Newsletter
Go
A Note on Syrian Refugees in the Gulf: Attempting to Assess Data and Policies
      
Privacy Policy | Contact Us | Terms & Conditions | About Us |
Weather | Qibla Directions | Hijri Date Conversion Tool
Full Page :total time:0  |   09-- 09 Middle Page :0  --   | Right : 09 - 09--en--sess-enreq-en-coming